The Varty Family’s Visit to Sher Bagh and Ranthambhore

The Zulu word Londolozi means bprotector of all living things’. The phrase has a universal resonance and embraces all living things everywhere. Little wonder then that the cause of Tigers and Indiabs long alluring wilderness drew the Varty family to Sher Bagh and Ranthambhore last month. The Varty family name has been synonymous with the restoration of wildlife and an entire ethic of preservation across the African continent and particularly South Africa for over four decades now. Londolozi, their private game reserve in the Sabi Sands area of South Africa, bordering the Kruger National Park is a model for conservation and eco-tourism. Apart from being the best spot on earth for the viewing of leopards in the wild, Londolozi is a pioneering luxury destination which has created the benchmark for some of the finest eco-tourism practises. Furthermore, both Londolozi and Sher Bagh are members of the Relais & Chateaux family.

Sher Bagh is a luxurious, eco-friendly and socially responsible tented camp, where our guests experience Ranthambhore in its truest form.
Sher Bagh is a luxurious, eco-friendly and socially responsible tented camp, where our guests experience Ranthambhore in its truest form.

As SUJANbs private saloon pulled in, bearing the party at Sawai Madhopur Junction we knew this was an opportunity to display the best of our world; the thriving, pulsating rhythms of Ranthambhorebs wilderness to living legends of the Safari world.

The families arrived at the Sawai Madhopur Junction in SUJAN's private saloon.
The families arrived at the Sawai Madhopur Junction in SUJAN’s private saloon.

Sher Baghbs connection with the Vartybs is over a decade old. Dave and Shan Vartybs son, Boyd, a fourth generation scion of the Londolozi family first came to Sher Bagh, and Ranthambhore as an 18 year old lad for a bit of work experience when Jaisal first began running Sher Bagh, back in 2000. The association has persevered and we were delighted to welcome other memberbs of the Varty family; Shan, Dave, their daughter Bronwyn and her fiancC) Rich Laburn who were accompanied by their friends Pippa Clark and Siddharth Sriram, Sher Bagh veterans themselves.

Our troupe of Manganiars aroused uplifting evocations for Dave. Bronwyn and Richard were moved by the atmosphere and sheer drama of the Ranthambhore landscape and Shanbs infectious positive energy permeated every moment of the three daysb they were all here. These were three days of exchanging ideas, visions and experiences, of learning, reflection and repose and of course, three days of magnificent game viewing in Ranthambhore National Park.

The profusion of game b we passed herds of cheetal that varied from groups of 12 to nearly 50 b the unmissable beauty of jungle vines entwining Mughal palaces and Rajput chhatrisb was soon followed by Davebs first sighting of a wild tiger. Bratbs (T19) dominant sub-adult cub welcomed him with a dynamic snarl; a view that visibly moved bThe Great Safari Manb. A close appearance by Bratbs other male cub was followed by a demonstration of raw power and primordial awe for the great beast when an hour later, Ustad (T24) b currently Ranthambhorebs most infamous male tiger b crossed the road ahead of us near Phuta Kot. Moments later, Shan was equally (well, almost!) enthralled by the viewing of a breeding pair of Brown Fish Owls, ordinarily rare to see. Other drives caught sight of bear, jackal, marsh crocodile and another tiger with a scattering of birds in abundance. Only the leopards, never complacent about showing themselves kept a low profile.

The tigers come fairly close to our jeep.
The tigers come fairly close to our jeep.
A sub-adult cub looks at the jeep.
A sub-adult cub looks at the jeep.
One of a breeding pair of Brown Fish Owls, ordinarily rare to see.
One of a breeding pair of Brown Fish Owls, ordinarily rare to see.
Davebs first sighting of a wild tiger.
Davebs first sighting of a wild tiger.
Ranthambhore is the finest place in the world to photograph tigers in the wild.
Ranthambhore is the finest place in the world to photograph tigers in the wild.

An interaction between officers of the Forest Department was an enlivening affair, especially discussions about wildlife corridors, controlling grazing and the revitalisation of satellite forests and sanctuaries for imploding numbers of game. The meeting, conducted under the salubrious acreage of the great Banyan tree at Jogi Mahal had a somewhat spiritual resonance.

Discussing conservation across continents. Jaisal, Dave and Rich at Jogi Mahal.
Discussing conservation across continents. Jaisal, Dave and Rich at Jogi Mahal.

In between game drives, rapidly consumed picnics and the conviviality of the Sher Bagh campfire we spoke of Africa and the uncanny similarities between our cultures, as well as the distinct differences which enrich our experiences and make the world of conservation a truly global field, desperately in need of a partnership of preservation across continents. Other Sher Bagh guests joined in the conversation b both the serious stuff and the pervading jocularity of glorious evenings b in memorable fashion, but we shall skip those details for now! Our only complaint was the brevity of the visit and three days went by more swiftly than a monsoon in retreat. Nonetheless, the seedling of hope for the future of wildlife, across continents has once more been watered by the power of faith in Nature and its powers to heal itself, given a small helping hand by communitiesb remains stronger in all of us.

Ustad (T24) crossed the road ahead of us.
Ustad (T24) crossed the road ahead of us.

To learn more about Londolozi and their pioneering initiatives in conservation and eco-tourism please visit www.londolozi.com.

Written by Yusuf Ansari
Photography by Anjali & Jaisal Singh

4 thoughts on “The Varty Family’s Visit to Sher Bagh and Ranthambhore

    1. Hey Bron!
      SO good to hear from you! Thank you! Miss you guys massively and all the wonderful energy you brought with you. Please give my bestest to the folks!

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