Diwali in Tiger Country

The day started with a feeling of celebration in the air. All the staff were exceptionally chirpy and every corner you turned you were wished “Shub Diwali” (Happy Diwali). Sweets were a main feature of the day with staff recieving vast boxes of Mithai (a selection of confectionary and desserts) and everyone who came through the gates was greeted with Sohan Papri, a crisp and flaky textured sweet.

Diwali rangoli at the entrance to camp.

Diwali rangoli at the entrance to camp.

Kaju ki Barfi - An Indian sweet made with cashew nuts and widely gifted at special occasions and during festivals in India.
Kaju ki Barfi – An Indian sweet made with cashew nuts and widely gifted at special occasions and during festivals in India.

We were delighted to experience our first Diwali and needed no encouragement to head to Dasktakar, a nearby womens’ cooperative, to buy a new Diwali outfit. Having heard much about Dasktakar and seen many of the guests come back laden with clothes and gifts for people back home, we were in no way disappointed and found gorgeous hand-printed skirts and kurtas perfect for both Diwali and summer evenings in England.

Happy Diwali from the girls at Sher Bagh - Milly, Katherine, Tara and Hajra.
Happy Diwali from the girls at Sher Bagh – Milly, Katherine, Tara and Hajra.

As though by a Diwali miracle, the lull in tiger sightings over the last two days was turned around and the campfire was buzzing with tales of the day’s sightings. The camp looked exceptionally stunning with a sea of candles covering the pathways and a blazing fire around which guests tucked into a delicious Diwali supper. The Tiger-tini’s were flowing and we wouldn’t be surprised if there were a few sore heads on safari this morning!

All in all, an exceptionally magical night in Sher Bagh.

Diwali lights at Sher Bagh.
Diwali lights at Sher Bagh.

Written by Katherine and Milly
Katherine and Milly are Interns at Sher Bagh.

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