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Ranthambhore Mums and their Broods…

As the opening of Ranthambhore National Park’s nears ever closer, the excitement heightens as we are soon to be back in the forest catching up with our felines & friends.

 

Like a popular book ending on a cliffhanger torturing the captivated readers as they wait for the sequel, so too do the seasons in Ranthambhore- as the park gates close during the monsoon months and the forest and all that lives and grows there have some private time away from safari enthusiasts & globetrotters from around the world.

 

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T39 or Noor joins the cubs in a watering hole after finishing their sambar deer. Photograph by Vedant Thite.
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On a morning drive, we watch these sub adults males from T60’s litter playing right in the middle of the road while the mother is out patrolling her territory. Photograph by Vedant Thite.

Ranthambhore National Park over the last couple of seasons has been blessed with successful litters from its most majestic tigresses and what’s mostly on our minds as we look forward to the forthcoming season is meeting the next generation of tigers in the Park.

 

One of T39’s cubs trying her best to climb up a tree. Photograph by Vedant Thite.

At the close of last season, T60’s three sub-adult cubs were getting to the size and age where one would predict they would soon leave their untiring mother and establish their own territories. The metaphorical cliffhanger was so infuriating because right up to when closing time of the park was called, you saw the ever-increasing independence of these sub-adults which was a joy to photograph and observe. Both possibilities of there whereabouts excite us equally. If they are still with their mother, then to continue watching the family dynamics as the tensions of independence grow to palpable levels will be fascinating to witness. On the other hand, if they have already parted ways, the park will have the perfect start to its much-awaited sequel! The opportunity to watch three tigers, new to adulthood, establish their own territories as well as their own personalities is one of the greatest wildlife shows in the wild.

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T84 or Arrowhead, after a long morning patrol of her territory, finds a nice shady spot near a stream to escape the afternoon sun. Photograph by Vedant Thite.

This time last year, T60’s neighbour, T39 or Noor, as she is more commonly known, had given birth to three cubs. Her prowess and ease around safari vehicles even with her young cubs has made her a Ranthambhore favourite, allowing our guests & others from around the world to have some truly memorable sightings. It will be interesting to find out what these cubs have been up to and how they have matured since we last saw them. The same can be said of T41’s cub who was born at a similar time Noors.

 

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T60 and cubs cool off during the scorching heat of April. Photograph by Vedant Thite.

T19 or Krishna, inherited the dutiful genes from her mother, the much loved Macchli, and a couple of days before the park’s closure was seen nursing four tiny balls of striped fur. This will be her fourth litter and, like T39, her comfort around jeeps & humans will mean she’s a favourite to follow this season.

 

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After consuming a massive male sambar deer effortlessly caught by T39, the cubs try to nap in one of the cooler spots under a ficus tree. Photograph by Vedant Thite.

T84 or Arrowhead, a female offspring from one T19’s earlier litters, is currently the female ruler of the Ranthambhore lakes. Having chased off her sister, T83 (or for want of a better name, Lightening) and her brother T85 (Pacman), she is definitely the undisputed new queen. Towards the end of last season, she had been seen mating with various males, T57 and T91. With rumours circulating of a pregnancy this is another surprise that awaits us. Could she join the pantheon of majestic mothers that Ranthambhore seem to produce so regularly?

 

As you can tell, as the curtains closed at the end of last season there was much anticipation and excitement over what the monsoon months would bring. There really is no place quite like Ranthambhore for viewing these amazing animals in the wild. Stay tuned to our weekly blog to hear all the latest news from Sher Bagh and our safari adventures and we look forward to welcoming you there.

 

 

 

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